• Angular Limb Deformities

    Many young foals have crooked hind or front legs. Lax ligaments and weak muscles usually cause this discrepancy between legs, which is often self-correcting as the horse grows. However, this deviation makes the young horses more likely to crush the cuboidal bones during exercise. If this happens, once

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  • Abscesses and Cysts

    Cysts and abscesses can both form lumps on a horse’s body. However, they stem from different causes. Infections cause abscesses, which are full of pus that accumulates under the skin. Cysts are typically present from birth or form during a horse’s development. In some cases, a veterinarian will recommend

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  • Equine Movement Disorder

    Several conditions can affect how horses move. This includes ones that affect the spinal cord and nerves that run to the muscles as well as to the hooves. Stringhalt Stringhalt shows up in horses as a jump, jerk or hop in the one or both hindlimbs, with the legs tucked up high. Symptoms often start suddenly.

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  • Degenerative Problems

    Degenerative disorders are conditions that worsen over time. Some can be improved, or at least slowed, if caught early on. Here are a few common degenerative conditions that horses may face. Myelopathy Myelopathy is also called wobbler syndrome because of the affected horse’s unstable gait. This condition

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  • Dentistry

    Dentistry for Horses Like people, horses can develop dental problems. Also like people, some horses can be stoic in the face of major dental pain while a minor dental issue may compromise the performance of a more sensitive horse. This is why horses need regular exams to maximize their dental health. Foals

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  • Deworming and Internal Parasites

    Like any animal, horses are susceptible to a wide range of parasites. Of the approximately 150 species of internal equine parasites, some can cause serious harm while others are more of an annoyance. Usually parasite eggs or larvae arrive on the ground from the manure of infected horses. Another horse

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  • Diagnostic Imaging

    Diagnostic imaging allows veterinarians to see inside a horse’s body without the need for surgery. X-rays are probably the best-known type of diagnostic imaging, but many others are available to help diagnose illnesses and other health problems in horses. Each type of diagnostic imaging has its own

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  • Digestive Health

    A horse’s digestive system begins with the mouth, ends with the anus and incorporates all the organs in between that are involved in consuming and processing food. Its purpose is fourfold: to digest food, absorb nutrients, move food through the digestive tract and eliminate waste products in the form

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  • Equine Motor Neuron Disease

    This relatively new disease was first diagnosed in 1990 in the state of New York. It’s still a rare condition and mostly confined to the United States. Symptoms Horse owners might first notice that their horse is eating plenty, but still managing to lose a lot of weight. He might have a short gait,

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  • Viral Infectious Diseases

    Infectious diseases are those that one horse passes to another, or that mosquitoes or other vectors transmit. Some are more common than others. Treatments and prognoses vary, but your veterinarian can help by recommending appropriate vaccinations. Here are some of the more common viral diseases. Equine

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  • Venereal Disease

    Venereal diseases, also known as sexually-transmitted infections or diseases, are infections that can be passed during sexual contact. In horses, the two most common ones include: Equine viral arteritis Contagious equine metritis Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA) Equine viral arteritis is a contagious sexually-transmitted

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  • Uveitis (Moon Blindness)

    Equine recurrent uveitis (also known as Moon Blindness or periodic ophthalmia) is one of the most common diseases that affect the eyes of adult horses. It is also the most common cause of blindness in horses, which makes prompt diagnosis and treatment of this condition essential. Causes of Equine Recurrent

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  • Arthritis in Horses

    Arthritis is one of the most common conditions causing lameness in older horses; in fact, arthritis is responsible for up to 60 percent of all lameness. Arthritis can affect the knee, joint, fetlock, coffin and hock. Arthritis that affects the pastern is also known as “ringbone.” Arthritis is the

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  • Seizures

    A seizure is caused by a period of abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Seizures tend to come on suddenly and end by themselves. They also sometimes occur again. There are three main types of seizures: Partial (or focused) seizures affect one part of the brain, which, in turn, leads to symptoms

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  • Thyroid Problems

    The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system and consists of two lobes located on the front of a horse’s neck. This gland produces hormones that regulate the body’s metabolism and affect most of the body’s tissues. When functioning normally, the thyroid is not visible, but certain diseases

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  • Physical Exam

    Your horse might look as healthy as, well, a horse, making you wonder whether he really needs an annual exam. However, if anything is wrong with your horse’s health, it’s always better to detect a problem earlier rather than later. Your equine veterinarian can also advise on preventive measures to

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